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Discoball Color Changing Slime Pigment Powder

Who doesn’t like glitter? If you’ going for shiny and sparkly, glitter is the way to go. While glitter glue was an older way of incorporating some sparkles to a slime, today’s slimers are using dry glitter as it creates room for more creativity since there are many more forms of dry glitter–from shaped flakes to thin glittery powders. Glitter is available in a wide range of colors. Whatever your recipe, you can always find the ideal glitter color to add some form of twinkle to your slime. Glitter slime can be used together with other slime add ins as well.

Minty Green Slime Pigment Powder

Not so many slimers use plastic buttons. But when we think about it further, they make for amazing, easily accessible and affordable slime accessories. You could use buttons from clothes you don’t put on anymore or you could opt for buying a jar of buttons to use for your next slime project. Vary the sizes and colors to create even more attractive slimes. Candy buttons can create an even prettier crunchy sludge. You can use small buttons that are not so bulky, so you won’t have to worry about overwhelming the slime.

Jelly foam is the primary ingredient in the creation of fluffy slime. Slimers have termed slime mixed with foam chunks as “floam”. You might have had a slimy bizarre toy when you were younger that you used to squish and squeeze–we’re talking about something like that. Mixing foam in slime is barely a new trend in the world of slime. The tiny white chunks make it interesting to listen to the sounds produced when you squish it. You can stretch the floam into some form of spider web or make it into a ball and bounce it. One popular slime birthed from the floam trend is bubble gum slime. This is typically a light pink slime with several ripped up foam cubes, which gives off the appearance of chewed up bubble gum.